Create Facebook Interest Lists to Listen and Stay Organized

Facebook interest lists
As someone who is constantly trying to break the social tools I use to get people thinking about wildlife, Facebook’s ability to create interest lists has been¬†an¬†incredibly effective way for me to keep tabs on a variety of subjects.

What is a Facebook Interest List?
The simple answer is that an interest list is a collection of pages or profiles on Facebook. By creating lists, Facebook allows you to organize and have some control over posts you see other than the standard algorithm they decide for you. When you group pages or subject matter experts, they call them interest lists and this allows you to see timely updates from pages that are part of the lists you follow.
List of USFWS pages

How do you create one?
Most of the lists I have created are collecting pages that represent subject matter experts, an interest or offer¬†resources around wildlife. Creating a list for your own personal or professional needs is quite simple and really the first step is having an idea of what you’d like to include in your list.

You don’t even have to “like” a page to add it to an interest. So technically, you can watch and observe posts from pages that you don’t want to publicly like through these lists.

After you’ve created your lists, they will appear in your “bookmarks” section on the left hand side of your home feed.

Searching Facebook InterestsSearch through Facebook interests.
If you’re looking to create lists that can serve as a resource for others, consider creating a public interest list that others can follow (very similar to the public lists on Twitter). You can also search for subjects and follow other public lists if you don’t want to create your own.

While the list has actually been out for several years, I feel like it is often a forgotten tactic in managing and listening on Facebook. Twitter lists are another similar resource, and I’ve found that¬†by grouping by passion or subject, you can keep tabs on the conversations while being apart of a larger conversation.

Sample lists I’ve made:

This may surprise you, most of my lists deal with wildlife. But you can make a list that collects and organizes any of your favorite pages that post updates you like. Have you ever used an interest list? If so, what was it?

5 Tools for Tracking Hashtags Like #WildlifeWeek

National Wildlife Week is one of NWF’s oldest programs and one of my all time favorites¬†to track. The history of National Wildlife Week is rich and geared heavily toward providing materials for schools and educators to celebrate different wildlife species. It makes for an excellent program for social media and every year I find fun ways to track the reach and engagement. This year– I compiled a few ways I tracked hashtags across platforms. Do you use additional programs? Let me know!

1) Tagboard

Tagboard tracks mentions of hashtags across Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Google+, Vine and App.net. It pulls all of the mentions into one place and allows you to even title the hashtag if you create an account.
#WildlifeWeek on Tagboard

2)Topsy (Both Analytics and Search)

This tool has both pro and free versions and I highly recommend using the free version to do a search on how your hashtag is performing.

TopsySearch

I even compared #WildlifeWeek with #NationalWildlifeWeek to see how people used the hashtags.

NWW Topsy

3) HashAtIt

This site shows the hashtag results for the Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.Hashatit.com   Hashtag Search

 

4) Hashtracking

This site allows for free trials so if you’re looking to test something out for tracking purposes it is a good place to start.

5) Tweet Binder

Tweet binder has a number of reports that generate when you use it. From contributor information to number of tweets– this is a very thorough tool for tracking hashtags.
Tweetbinder-NWWInfluencers

While I didn’t use them this time around- I have used and been happy with Rowfeeder, Mention.net and a number of other Twitter tracking tools- but this year I tracked with these five. What tools do you track your events with?